JamesRosen­quist

MuseumLudwig

Museum Ludwig
JAMES ROSENQUIST:
PAINTING AS IMMERSION/ Eintauchen ins Bild
Press conference: PK:
Donnerstag, 16. November 2017 | 11 Uhr
Wednesday, 15. November 2017 | 12 p.m.
Opening: Eröffnung:
Freitag, 17.11.2017 | 19 Uhr
Friday, 17. November 2017 | 7 p.m.
Speakers:
Susanne Laugwitz-Aulbach, Deputy Mayor of Fine Arts and Culture
Yilmaz Dziewior, Director Museum Ludwig
Curators: Stephan Diederich, Yilmaz Dziewior
Mimi Thompson Rosenquist will be present.
Exhibition: 18. November 2017 – 4. March 2018
Heinrich-Böll-Platz, 50667 Köln
http://www.museum-ludwig.de/

rosenq

 

JAMES ROSENQUIST:
PAINTING AS IMMERSION/ Eintauchen ins Bild

With the major exhibition on James Rosenquist (*1933–2017), for the first time ever the Museum Ludwig will present the works of this important representative of American Pop Art in the context of their cultural, social, and political dimensions. Along with archive materials, some of which have not previously been exhibited, as well as collages designated by the artist as source materials and many of the original advertisements that he used from old issues of Life magazine, the show will reveal a historical cosmos. After all, James Rosenquist’s compositions are to a large extent the result of his marked interest in the social and political events of his time.

A good example is the impressive installation F-111, one of the icons of the Pop era. Rosenquist created it in 1964, during one of the most politically turbulent decades in United States history. As the work’s main subject he chose the F-111 fighter jet, a state-of-the-art, high-tech weapon then under development, and unsettlingly combined it with images of everyday American consumerism. The painting surrounds the viewer on all sides. Reflected in aluminum panels, the viewer becomes part of the work and is invited to question what he or she sees. In addition to this key work from the MoMA collection, with Horse Blinders (1968–69) and Horizon Home Sweet Home (1970) the exhibition will present for the first time all three installations that Rosenquist created for the legendary Castelli Gallery.

 

JRF1112.jpg

This attempt to pull viewers into the picture, to involve them visually and physically, emotionally and intellectually, is also evident in the three-part, monumental ensemble entitled The Swimmer in the Econo-mist, which Rosenquist created between 1997 and 1998 for an exhibition in Berlin. The twenty-seven-meter-long painting combines Picasso’s Guernica with other elements from the artist’s biography as well as collective history and identity in a disorienting temporal amalgam that depicts rapid changes not only in German identity.

The exhibition follows the central aspect of “painting as immersion,” as the artist himself calls it, while offering a wide-ranging overview of James Rosenquist’s work. The collage-like paintings from the 1960s, which clearly reflect Rosenquist’s background as a painter of enormous billboards on Times Square, will be shown along with biographically motivated paintings from the 1970s and interpretations of cosmic phenomena in his later large-scale paintings.

 

roseludw

James Rosenquist himself authorized the concept and the selection of works for this exhibition and assisted with the development process from the very beginning. Now this will be the first major museum exhibition as an homage to the artist, who died on March 31 of this year. Along with works from the museum’s own collection and generous loans from James Rosenquist himself, important works from museums such as MoMA and the Guggenheim Museum in New York, the Centre Georges Pompidou in Paris, and the Moderna Museet in Stockholm will be shown.

The exhibition is supported by the Peter and Irene Ludwig Foundation as well as the Terra Foundation for American Art and the Gesellschaft für Moderne Kunst am Museum Ludwig. The restoration of Horse Blinders was made possible by the Ministry of Culture and Science of the State of North Rhine-Westphalia as well as the Wüstenrot Foundation. After its showing at the Museum Ludwig, the exhibition will travel to the ARoS Aarhus Art Museum in Denmark.

A catalog will be published by Prestel Verlag with texts by Sarah Bancroft, Stephan Diederich, Yilmaz Dziewior, Isabel Gebhardt, Tim Griffin, Tom Holert, and Tino Graß.

http://www.museum-ludwig.de/

 

 

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hayat-art

GRASSE- INTERNATIONAL MUSEUM OF PERFUMERY
Musée International de la Parfumerie
YVES HAYAT, PERFUME,
THAT OBCURE OBJECT OF DESIRE
Exhibition: 28. October 2017 – 7. January 2018
2 Bd du Jeu de Ballon – 06131 Grasse Cedex
http://www.hayat-art.com /
http://www.museesdegrasse.com/en/evenement/perfume-obscure-object-desire
https://www.hayat-art.com

 

yvesparf.jpg

 

The International Musem of Perfumery devotes its winter exhibition to a visual artist:

Yves Hayat
PERFUME, THAT OBSCURE OBJECT OF DESIRE.
EXHIBITION : 28 OCTOBER 2017 – 7 JANUARY 2018

There will be some 21 pieces and 3 installations on display from 27 October to 07 January, 2018.

Yves HAYAT, like any artist, like any philosopher, transcribes in his works a personal and unique understanding of the world.

The images he provides for our eyes, in this exhibition entitled, “Perfume, that Obscure Object of Desire,1” are not about where two worlds overlap, they respond to each other and are, in fact, the true and complex representation of one and the same humanity. The exhibition is, in any case, an initiation to the strange truth of life; a truth which no longer starts, to echo Edgar Morin’s observation, from a firm surface, but rather from a surface which is collapsing.

The work of Yves HAYAT on the euphemism of constant threat explores all human mysteries. His originality is in amalgamating artistic sublimation with the reign of violence: no celebration of cruelty but rather its vertiginous self-reflection, via a presentation of the exaltation of life, of the cynical gaze we have when we accept the unacceptable, to make us aware of what we are living. Life is triumphant in his works. The mannered image represents not only a juxtaposition of situations. It’s about rendering the tragic beauty of our world as it is and catching the human resentment which is always at work.

Although perfume seems to be an eternal scent above human dramas, the contingencies of our barbarity, the bottles “Places of the Revolution” show us to what point, over a short period, we are undergoing paradigm shifts. Far from tricking us, and far from beautifying the harshness, cynicism and coldness of the process of de-humanisation which can be observed in our society, Yves Hayat leaves us under no illusions with images inspired by the era of communication and the tendency to media overkill, he subtly, indeed intelligently, re-orients the image and it is on this level that the artist works, he gets rid of all the formatting, he plunges himself into other worlds and succeeds in bringing about the strange reality of the misery of existence, with a demonical sense all his own. He rehabilitates our world.

Even if our planet seems prey to every atrocity, it is also inhabited, spiritually and romantically, by desire. This grip of reality is not a necessary artifice of Yves Hayat’s work, it is its very substance. Each of the perfume bottles conceived by him contains our worlds and as a whole they make the exhibition an explosion of contrasts, gradations where unity is multi-faceted. This is a great voyage of odours, far from the “odour of sanctity,” during which one never stops viewing, feeling life and death, pleasure and pain, the masculine and the feminine, light and shadow and so on, not in terms of opposition, but as one and the same thing in all its complexity.

Furthermore, in our world which generates suffering and death, it is perfume bottles which enclose the exaltations of life as further defined by Nietzsche, dominated by the games of Eros and Thanatos. These perfumes contain angels and demons. By presenting a series of these perfume stills, an expression of creation, refinement, elegance and sensuality, Yves Hayat leads us also to wonder about the value and scope of the technique.

Understanding the meaning of the exhibition’s title: “Perfume, That Obscure Object of Desire,” requires a particular cast of mind to discern the idea according to which art can reveal to us declinations of that beauty which remains the generative power of all our life.

Yves HAYAT fulfils his function in establishing a dialogue with you, within you, allowing access to an interpretation of our stressful world, by expressing human nature despite the inhumanity of acts and highlighting the intensity of life, despite the presence of death in his works. Certainly, there is a philosophical sense in Yves Hayat’s works which denounces the lack of differentiation of conformity and mass culture imposing the diktat of cultural phenomena, styles and feelings. Via the strangeness of the play of overlay, confusion, coexistence of worlds, you can understand an artistic work which is based on an exchange between the real and the symbolic as a favoured mode of exploring otherness, of others and oneself.

Despite appearances, you will thus have understood that this is, in fact, an exhibition full of faith in existence, as the emphasis is not on the “marketed” abominations of our world but an ethics against the worries of our consciousness which, for too long, has become used to indulge itself in a kind of illusion of melancholy or solitude of narcissistic depression which often only amounts to a fear of freedom.

François Birembaux, 2017

 

YVES HAYAT
PERFUME, THAT OBCURE OBJECT OF DESIRE

Yves HAYAT, like any artist, like any philosopher, transcribes in his works a personal and unique understanding of the world. The images he provides for our eyes, in this exhibition entitled, “Perfume, that Obscure Object of Desire,1” are not about where two worlds overlap, they respond to each other and are, in fact, the true and complex representation of one and the same humanity. The exhibition is, in any case, an initiation to the strange truth of life; a truth which no longer starts, to echo Edgar Morin’s observation, from a firm surface, but rather from a surface which is collapsing.

The work of Yves HAYAT on the euphemism of constant threat explores all human mysteries. His originality is in amalgamating artistic sublimation with the reign of violence: no celebration of cruelty but rather its vertiginous self-reflection, via a presentation of the exaltation of life, of the cynical gaze we have when we accept the unacceptable, to make us aware of what we are living. Life is triumphant in his works. The mannered image represents not only a juxtaposition of situations. It’s about rendering the tragic beauty of our world as it is and catching the human resentment which is always at work.

 

coco-2.jpg

Idées noires

Although perfume seems to be an eternal scent above human dramas, the contingencies of our barbarity, the bottles “Places of the Revolution” show us to what point, over a short period, we are undergoing paradigm shifts. Far from tricking us, and far from beautifying the harshness, cynicism and coldness of the process of de-humanisation which can be observed in our society, Yves Hayat leaves us under no illusions with images inspired by the era of communication and the tendency to media overkill, he subtly, indeed intelligently, re-orients the image and it is on this level that the artist works, he gets rid of all the formatting, he plunges himself into other worlds and succeeds in bringing about the strange reality of the misery of existence, with a demonical sense all his own. He rehabilitates our world.

Even if our planet seems prey to every atrocity, it is also inhabited, spiritually and romantically, by desire.

This grip of reality is not a necessary artifice of Yves Hayat’s work, it is its very substance. Each of the perfume bottles conceived by him contains our worlds and as a whole they make the exhibition an explosion of contrasts, gradations where unity is multi-faceted. This is a great voyage of odours, far from the “odour of sanctity,” during which one never stops viewing, feeling life and death, pleasure and pain, the masculine and the feminine, light and shadow and so on, not in terms of opposition, but as one and the same thing in all its complexity.

 

unnamed-3.jpg

A la recherche des senteurs perdues

 

Furthermore, in our world which generates suffering and death, it is perfume bottles which enclose the exaltations of life as further defined by Nietzsche, dominated by the games of Eros and Thanatos. These perfumes contain angels and demons. By presenting a series of these perfume stills, an expression of creation, refinement, elegance and sensuality, Yves Hayat leads us also to wonder about the value and scope of the technique.

Understanding the meaning of the exhibition’s title: “Perfume, That Obscure Object of Desire,” requires a particular cast of mind to discern the idea according to which art can reveal to us declinations of that beauty which remains the generative power of all our life.

Yves HAYAT fulfils his function in establishing a dialogue with you, within you, allowing access to an interpretation of our stressful world, by expressing human nature despite the inhumanity of acts and highlighting the intensity of life, despite the presence of death in his works. Certainly, there is a philosophical sense in Yves Hayat’s works which denounces the lack of differentiation of conformity and mass culture imposing the diktat of cultural phenomena, styles and feelings. Via the strangeness of the play of overlay, confusion, coexistence of worlds, you can understand an artistic work which is based on an exchange between the real and the symbolic as a favoured mode of exploring otherness, of others and oneself.

 

unnamed-5.jpg

Larmes de Coco

 

Despite appearances, you will thus have understood that this is, in fact, an exhibition full of faith in existence, as the emphasis is not on the “marketed” abominations of our world but an ethics against the worries of our consciousness which, for too long, has become used to indulge itself in a kind of illusion of melancholy or solitude of narcissistic depression which often only amounts to a fear of freedom.
François Birembaux, 2017

1 “That Obscure Object of Desire” is the title of the 1977 film by Luis Buñuel after the novel of Pierre Louÿs, The Woman and the Puppet”.

 

 

Places de la Révolution

 

rosed-6.jpg

Fleurs blessées

 

 

Hommage à Bernd et Hilla Becher

YVES HAYAT
Originally from Egypt, Yves Hayat first developed his aesthetic sensibilities living in a country enriched with history and cultural diversity. Art was his first love. In 1956, after the Egyptian Revolution, Hayat left for France. For five years, he studied Art at the Ecole Nationale des Arts Décoratifs of Nice.

In 1973, Hayat chooses to go into advertising and marketing, which led him to open his own agency. The creative trade captivated Hayat. His experience in the field also enabled him to discover and learn to use new forms of technology, and master his techniques.

In the 1990s, equipped with those skills, he decided to return to art, rediscovering the old masters, photographing people, the streets, society products, museum paintings and recuperating magazine and web images, which are carefully classified. Hayat is a perfect example of his time: an open mind on society, its streets, its media, its internet. While running his successful advertising business, he starts to show his artwork in galleries. Soon, his art practice took precedence over his profession, which he ended in 2002.

Yves Hayat explains: “I admit that I’m more interested in manipulating reality than in recording it. My artwork, between photography, installation, and “Figuration Narrative,” proposes visions where theatricalization is a part of the project. I am a total visual consumer: I film, download, scan, retouch…. as the director of a new reality. Using superimpositions, shifts, and misappropriations, I confront past and present, beauty and horror, luxury and violence, indifference and fanaticism. Through a questioning about the art/politics/media relations, I try to conceive a critical artwork where the attraction for the culture of media, cinema and advertising shows through. Using modern techniques, my work proposes a report of what our history and our society have thought, generated, transformed, destroyed… while always keeping in mind that when the work of art creates unrest, it evacuates the common place”.

The originality of Yves Hayat’s works lies in the amalgam of artistic perception with images from a communication and information-based society. The titles he gives to his works (Business must go on, Parfum de Révolte, The Icons are Tired, Femmes au bord de la crise de guerre, the Shadow of your Smile…) from utterly highjacked advertising slogans, have the effect of giving a meaning to the pollution of our everyday lives. They reveal our identity and display our own brand. Not a celebration of barbarity, but rather the fascination created by human ambivalence (…).
https://www.hayat-art.com

EXHIBITIONS :

Since 2006, Yves Hayat exhibited in solo shows in:

Paris, Vienna, Cologne, Geneva, Brussels, Ghent,
Greece, Kuwait, Beirut, Monaco, Cannes, London,
New York and Istanbul

and in institutions such as:
Rom, San Silvestro al Quirinale Church (installation in 2017)
Paris City Hall (solo show),
Venice (Palazzo Bonvicini, Biennale 2013 and Vitraria Glass+A Museum in 2014-2015),
Alliance Française of Montevideo (solo show),,
Docks of Marseilles (solo show),,
Sigmund Freud Museum Vienna,
Klosterneuburg Monastery Vienna,
Festival of Avignon, …

He was also presented in several international art Fairs :
Scope Basel, Art Beirut, Art Miami New York, ArtFair Cologne (solo show), Art Southampton-New York, Contemporary Istanbul, Art Stage Singapore, Scope Miami, Art 14 London, India Art Fair, FotoFever Paris (solo show), …

With the kind participation of
GALERIE MARK HACHEM
PARIS / BEIRUT / NEW YORK

 

 

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dagmar-chobot-skulpturenpreis-2017

dagmchobot17.54.37.png

DAGMAR CHOBOT SKULPTURENPREIS 2017
SOFIE THORSEN
Preisträgerin / Awardee
PREISTRÄGERIN DES DAGMAR CHOBOT SKULPTURENPREIS 2017
http://www.galerie-chobot.at/templ/chobot/index.php
http://www.bildrecht.at/news/preisverleihung-dagmar-chobot-skulpturenpreis-2017

 

preisd-4.jpg
v.l.n.r. Günter Schönberger, Geschäftsführer, Bildrecht
Sofie Thorsen, Preisträgerin, Dagmar Chobot Skulpturenpreis 2017
Dagmar Chobot, Preisstifterin
Foto: Eva Kelety / Copyright: Dagmar Chobot Skulpturenpreis | © Bildrecht, Wien 2017

Wien, 17. Oktober 2017
Sofie Thorsen erhält den mit 10.000 Euro dotierten ‚Dagmar Chobot Skulpturenpreis 2017’. Preisstifterin Dagmar Chobot und Günter Schönberger, Geschäftsführer der Stiftungspartnerin Bildrecht, ehrten die Künstlerin am 16. Oktober 2017 im Leopold Museum Wien mit diesem in Österreich einzigartigen Nominierungspreis für zeitgenössische Skulptur.

Neben Sofie Thorsen waren Manfred Erjautz, Sophie Hirsch, Markus Jeschaunig, Bernd Oppl und Werner Reiterer für den ‚Dagmar Chobot Skulpturenpreis 2017’ vorgeschlagen.
„Es freut mich sehr, dass der von mir ins Leben gerufene Skulpturenpreis auf so reges Interesse stößt. Die vielen positiven Rückmeldungen haben meine Initiative im Nachhinein nochmals bestätigt. Ich freue mich auch für Sofie Thorsen, – mit ihr als Preisträgerin erfährt die zeitgenössische Skulptur jene Wertschätzung und öffentliche Aufmerksamkeit, die ihr zusteht.“, kommentiert die Initiatorin und Preisstifterin, Dagmar Chobot, bei der Preisverleihung.
„Der ‚Dagmar Chobot Skulpturenpreis’ ist eine große Bereicherung für die heimische Kunstpreislandschaft. Mit der diesjährigen Verleihung an Sofie Thorsen unterstreicht die Jury den Stellenwert der erweiterten Skulptur als maßgebliches künstlerisches Medium. Ich bin davon überzeugt, dass auch in den nächsten Jahren spannende Positionen diesen Preis prägen werden“, so Günter Schönberger, Geschäftsführer der Bildrecht, die als Stiftungspartnerin den Skulpturenpreis organisatorisch betreut.
Modalitäten
2017 haben sechs NominatorInnen jeweils eine Position aus dem Bereich zeitgenössische Skulptur, Plastik, Objektkunst oder Installation für den ‚Dagmar Chobot Skulpturenpreis’ eingereicht. Aus diesen Vorschlägen ermittelte die Jury Sofie Thorsen als Preisträgerin für 2017.
NominatorInnen 2017
Silvie Aigner (Chefredakteurin Parnass), Katrin Bucher-Trantow (Chefkuratorin Kunsthaus Graz), Berthold Ecker (Direktor MUSA Wien), Elsy Lahner (Kuratorin Albertina Wien), Genoveva Rückert (Kuratorin OK – Offenes Kulturhaus Linz) und Christoph Thun-Hohenstein (Direktor MAK Wien)
Jury 2017
Dagmar Chobot (Preisstifterin und Juryvorsitzende), Heike Eipeldauer (Kuratorin BA Kunstforum Wien), Edelbert Köb (Kurator), Günter Schönberger (Geschäftsführer Bildrecht) und Hans-Peter Wipplinger (Direktor Leopold Museum Wien)
DAGMAR CHOBOT SKULPTURENPREIS
Der ‚Dagmar Chobot Skulpturenpreis’ wurde 2016 von der Wiener Galeristin Dagmar Chobot und der Stiftungspartnerin Bildrecht, der Urheberrechtgesellschaft für Bildende Kunst, ins Leben gerufen. Die Auszeichnung geht jährlich an eine/n zeitgenössische/n Bildhauer/in, die/der in Österreich lebt und arbeitet. Als erster Preis seiner Art in Österreich ist er explizit dem Medium Skulptur gewidmet und berücksichtigt neben klassischen Zugängen auch experimentelle Ansätze und Installationen. Der Preis unterliegt keiner Altersbeschränkung.

 

sopthor5
Spielplastiken, 2013, Stahl, Inkjetprint, Maße variabel. Installationsansicht Sofie Thorsen: Spielplastiken, tresor, Kunstforum Wien,
Foto: Christian Wachter, Courtesy Sofie Thorsen / Galerie Krobath

 

SOFIE THORSEN PREISTRÄGERIN 2017
In ihren Werken setzt sich Sofie Thorsen mit den politischen, sozialen und kunsthistorischen Kontexten von Orten auseinander mit dem Ziel, ihre „stummen und verstummten“ Strukturen wieder zum Sprechen zu bringen. Ihre Methode erinnert an eine Spurensuche, die Sofie Thorsen von der Aneignung und Adaption vorgefundener Bilddokumente bis hin zu deren Auflösung führt. Mit ihren Arbeiten erforscht die Künstlerin formale, materielle und haptische Parameter, Formen und Körper und kombiniert in raumgreifenden Installationen die für ihren Skulpturenbegriff charakteristischen Materialien Stahl, Aluminium und Papier.
Ein Themenkomplex analysiert die Bereiche Skulptur, Architektur und Design in ihrem Verhältnis zu Gesellschaft und kommunaler Verantwortung. In der mehrfach präsentierten Werkserie „Spielplastiken“ (2010–2016) rückt Sofie Thorsen ein bislang kaum gewürdigtes Phänomen der österreichischen Nachkriegszeit – bespielbare Skulpturen aus den 1950er Jahren – in den Mittelpunkt. Diese kleinen, abstrakten Utopien inmitten nüchterner Architektursprache greift die Künstlerin für ihre Installationen auf. Darin vergrößert sie Reprografien von Zeitdokumenten, eliminiert figurative Bestandteile, reduziert die Konstruktionen auf ihre Geometrie und Linearität. Die fragilen Papierobjekte auf den Metallgerüsten geben den Bildquellen ihre einstige skulpturale Präsenz zurück und geraten zu einem in den Raum gestellten, begehbaren Archiv der Formen.
In ihrer Werkserie „Precious Things That Come Out of the Ground“ (2017) analysiert Sofie Thorsen mittels abstrakter Zeichenhaftigkeit die An- und Abwesenheit von zerstörtem und/oder geraubtem Kulturgut aus archäologischen Fundstätten. Auffällig ist auch hier die Gestaltung mit filigranem Papier, das Sofie Thorsen über die gebogenen Stahlrohre ihrer Installation mäandern lässt. Mit punktuellen Unschärfen und Unterbrechungen der skulpturalen Form irritiert die Künstlerin und betont damit unterschiedliche Ebenen und Formen der Realitätswahrnehmung. Sophie Thorsens Arbeiten eröffnen so ein Feld ambivalenter Sichtbarkeiten und changieren zwischen erkennbarer Realitätsabbildung und möglicher Fiktion. Ab 20. Oktober 2017 ist diese Werkserie in der Gruppenausstellung „Spuren der Zeit“ im Leopold Museum Wien zu sehen.
Sofie Thorsen, *1971 in Århus, lebt und arbeitet in Wien. Sie ist Absolventin der Akademie der Bildenden Künste Wien und der Königlich Dänischen Akademie der Bildenden Künste Kopenhagen. Von 2005 bis 2009 lehrte sie an der Akademie der Bildenden Künste Wien.
https://www.sofiethorsen.net

 

sthtste.jpg
Precious Things That Come out of the Ground, 2017, Stahl, Inkjetprint. Installationsansicht Spuren der Zeit, Leopold Museum Wien
Foto: Lisa Rastl, Courtesy Sofie Thorsen / Galerie Krobath

PREISSTIFTERIN DAGMAR CHOBOT
Mit dem ‚Dagmar Chobot Skulpturenpreis’ verknüpft Dagmar Chobot den persönlichen Wunsch einer nachhaltigen Förderung eines für sie maßgeblichen künstlerischen Mediums, das sie seit 1971 als Galeristin, Kuratorin und Sammlerin im Rahmen ihrer Ausstellungsaktivitäten in den Blickpunkt der Öffentlichkeit rückt.
STIFTUNGSPARTNERIN BILDRECHT
Um die Organisation und die Fortschreibung des Stiftungszweckes zu sichern, wurde die Bildrecht als institutionelle Stiftungspartnerin gewählt. Als Urheberrechtsgesellschaft im Bereich der bildenden Kunst sensibilisiert sie die Öffentlichkeit für kulturrelevante Themen und stärkt die existenzielle Basis von über 4000 KünstlerInnen österreichweit durch die Wahrnehmung von Rechten und Vergütungsansprüchen, durch umfassende Förderprogramme und durch zahlreiche Ausstellungsaktivitäten.
http://www.galerie-chobot.at/templ/chobot/index.php

 

 

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kunst-ins-leben

mumok

mumok
museum moderner kunst stiftung ludwig wien
Kunst ins Leben!
Der Sammler Wolfgang Hahn und die 60er Jahre
Pressekonferenz: 8. November 2017 | 10 Uhr
Eröffnung / Opening:
9. November 2017 | 19 Uhr
Kuratiert von: Susanne Neuburger mumok
Barbara Engelbach /Museum Ludwig Köln
Ausstellungsarchitektur: Eva Chytilek & Jakob Neulinger
In Kooperation mit Museum Ludwig, Köln
Ausstellung: 10. November 2017 – 24. Juni 2018
Museumsplatz 1, A-10­70 Wien
http://www.mumok.at/

 

hahnd.jpg

 

 

Kunst ins Leben!
Der Sammler Wolfgang Hahn und die 60er Jahre
10. November 2017 – 24. Juni 2018

Das Rheinland war in den 1960er-Jahren ein wichtiger Schauplatz für die Umwälzungen in der zeitgenössischen Kunst. Damals brach eine neue, international vernetzte Generation von Künstler_innen mit dem traditionellen Kunstverständnis. Inspiration lieferte der Alltag. Alltagsgegenstände bildeten das Material. Diese Künstler_innen arbeiteten zudem im städtischen Umfeld. Sie durchbrachen die Grenzen der Disziplinen und kollaborierten mit Musiker_innen, Literat_innen, Filmemacher_innen und Tänzer_innen. Am Puls dieser ungewöhnlichen Zeit begann der Kölner Restaurator Wolfgang Hahn (1924–1987), die neue Kunst zu erwerben. Über die Jahre trug er eine der heute bedeutendsten Sammlungen zeitgenössischer Kunst mit Werken des Nouveau Réalisme, Fluxus, Happening, der Pop Art und Konzeptkunst zusammen. Nach einer erfolgreichen ersten Station der Ausstellung im Kölner Museum Ludwig wird die Sammlung des passionierten Kunstliebhabers ab 10. November 2017 auf zwei Ebenen im mumok zu sehen sein.
Teil des Projektes in Wien ist eine Re-Invention von Allan Kaprows Push and Pull durch die Künstler_innen Eva Chytilek und Jakob Neulinger.

 

 

whahnd

 

Hahn war Chefrestaurator am Wallraf-Richartz-Museum und später am Museum Ludwig in Köln. Vor seiner Ausbildung zum Restaurator hatte er fünf Jahre Kunstgeschichte studiert. Doch bekannt wurde er vor allem durch seine Tätigkeit als Sammler, Vermittler und insbesondere Gastgeber. Hahn lebte nach der Forderung der Avantgarden: Kunst und Leben bildeten für ihn eine Einheit. Seine Beschäftigung mit der Kunst endete nicht mit getaner Arbeit. Sie wurde bei Galerienrundgängen und bis zu später Stunde im eigenen Haus weitergeführt. Künstler_innen gingen dort ein und aus. „Das war unser Alltag, unsere Normalität. Derartige Abende waren zahlreich; interessant und belebend waren sie alle“, erinnert sich die Witwe Hildegard Helga Hahn an das Leben mit der Kunst. Und so füllte sich die Doppelhaushälfte der Hahns nach und nach mit heute Arbeiten der wichtigsten Künstler_innen der 1960er-Jahre. Treppenhaus, Wohn- und Schlafzimmer, Abstellräume, selbst Keller und Garten bis hin zum eineinhalb Quadratmeter großen Gäste-WC wurden zu Ausstellungsräumen für die von ihnen erworbenen Werke, darunter Arbeiten von Arman, Joseph Beuys, George Brecht, John Cage, Christo, Jim Dine, Robert Filliou, Allan Kaprow, Yayoi Kusama, Gordon Matta-Clark, Claes Oldenburg, Yoko Ono, Nam June Paik, Niki de Saint Phalle, Daniel Spoerri, Paul Thek, Jean Tinguely, Franz Erhard Walther, Andy Warhol, Lawrence Weiner, Wolf Vostell und vielen mehr.

1978 konnte ein Großteil der Sammlung vom mumok angekauft und 2003 durch einen weiteren Ankauf vervollständigt werden. Dazu kam 2005 die Schenkung der Bibliothek Hahn durch Hildegard Hahn. In der Gesamtheit bildet sie die ganze Komplexität der Kunst der 1960er-Jahre ab. In Zusammenarbeit mit dem Museum Ludwig Köln kann die Sammlung 2017 erstmals in vollem Umfang der Öffentlichkeit präsentiert werden.

Museumsplatz 1, A-10­70 Wien

https://www.mumok.at/de/kunst-ins-leben-0

 

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the-beard-pictures

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GALERIE THADDAEUS ROPAC – PANTIN
GILBERT & GEORGE
THE BEARD PICTURES
Opening: Wednesday 18 October 2017 | 10pm
19 Oct. 2017 – 20 Jan. 2018
69, AVENUE DU GÉNÉRAL LECLERC FR-93500 PANTIN
http://ropac.net/exhibition/the-beard-pictures

 

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Galerie Thaddaeus Ropac is delighted to announce an exhibition of Gilbert and George’s newest body of work THE BEARD PICTURES. Created over the past two years, the pictures will be unveiled over the next months in a series of exhibitions in New York, Paris, London, Brussels, Naples and Athens. The artists have made a selection of the BEARD PICTURES for Galerie Thaddaeus Ropac in Paris Pantin, which will vary in size up to the 23 m long triptych OLD BEARD RUIN.

Regarding this exhibition, the British writer and novelist Michael Bracewell states: “THE BEARD PICTURES are violent, eerie, grotesque, lurid and crazed. They show a dream-like world of paranoia and destruction and madness. Their strange sickly colours and creeping, smashed up, absurd landscapes confront the viewer with relentless aggression. They depict a world bereft of reason, in which negotiation no longer exists.

Gilbert & George take their places within the BEARD PICTURES as intense, red, staring, empty-headed and sinister versions of themselves. Their eyes are shadowed and bizarrely prettified. Mutant impish explorers or dead-headed sentinels, they seem to look at, into and through the viewer. They look possessed and serious. They look as though their spirits might have left their bodies. They look stern, absurd, imprisoned, mocking and mocked. In each picture they wear beards that are surreal and symbolic. Beards made of wire mesh, beards made of beer foam, beards made of flowers, beards comprising rabbits with snakes for tongues. Secular and sacred, the throwback emblem of hip millennial youth as well as a mark of religious faith, the beard is depicted in the BEARD PICTURES as both mask and meaning: a sign of the times.

In some of the BEARD PICTURES, the artists stand either in front of a barbed wire or mesh fence, or behind one. Elsewhere, rusted steel rods sprout from collapsing buildings of pre-stressed concrete. In yet other pictures, Gilbert & George are unsmiling comic grotesques, with tiny bodies and huge heads. Behind them a blank silvery void, extravagant ornamental foliage, wire mesh fencing, newspaper advertisements for bouncers, builders and sex workers, the heads in relief of popes, monarchs, worthies and heroes.

Aggressively absurd, trashing contemporary artistic niceties but resonant with intense symbolism, THE BEARD PICTURES turn history into a mad parade, their mood shape-shifting between that of science fiction, lucid dreaming and Victorian caricature. It is a vision and a form which brings to mind Oscar Wilde’s account of Walter Pater’s ‘Essays’: ‘…others are medieval in their strangeness of colour and passionate suggestion, and all of them absolutely modern, in the true meaning of the term modernity. For he to whom the present is the only thing that is present, knows nothing of the age in which he lives.’”

In the half century that they have lived and worked together as Living Sculptures, embarked on a visionary journey through the modern world, always together and always alone, Gilbert & George have made fiercely singular Anti-Art that is poetic, primal and emotionally driven. Order and madness are held in tension, vaudevillian and nursery rhyme absurdity take on the air of paranormal ritual.

The more the viewer contemplates the BEARD PICTURES, the more Gilbert & George appear like poltergeists within the cause of art and spirit sentinels within a world gone mad. In this chaos of trashed aesthetics and reversed values, all has become symbol and surface: mad symbols, presented with deadly seriousness. And as such they study the viewer.”

 

gilbert2.jpg

 

Gilbert (born in the Dolomites, Italy in 1943) and George (born in Devon, England in 1942) met in the sculpture department at St Martin’s School of Art in London in 1967. For their end-of-year exhibition, the Snow Show, Gilbert and George created their first work as a joint effort, a far cry from the formalist criteria of the art taught at the time. Their first break-through came with Singing Sculpture in 1969, when they covered themselves in multi-coloured metallic powder and sang the music-hall classic Underneath the Arches in various locations around London. The pictures dating from the early 1970s are their first grid-arrangements, a format that would henceforth become their formal signature. In the 1980s, their iconography became more complex, drawing upon symbolism and allegory to explore themes of eroticism, religion, and politics.

During a career that has spanned 50 years, Gilbert & George have worked together as one artist and enjoyed significant international recognition. They have won several awards, including the Turner Prize (1986) and have been honoured with many distinctions, including the title of Honorary Professor of Philosophy at London Metropolitan University. They represented the UK at the 51st International Venice Biennale in 2005.

Their extensive number of solo exhibitions includes The Stedelijk Van Abbemuseum in Eindhoven (1980), Guggenheim Museum, New York (1985), National Gallery, Beijing (1993), Shanghai Art Museum (1993), Musée d’Art Moderne de la Ville de Paris (1998), Serpentine Gallery, London (2002), Tate Modern, London, Haus der Kunst, Munich (both 2007), Brooklyn Museum of Art, New York (2008), CAC Malaga, Spain, Museum of Contemporary Art, Zagreb, Croatia, Palais des Beaux Arts, Brussels, Belgium, Deichtorhallen, Hamburg, Germany, Lentos Kunstmuseum, Linz, Austria, Laznia Centre for Contemporary Art, Gdansk, Poland (all in 2010), Nouveau Musée National de Monaco (2014), Museum of Modern Art, New York (2015), Museum of Old and New Art, Tasmania, Australia (2015) and Ludwig Museum of Contemporary Art, Budapest (2017).

A fully illustrated catalogue with an essay by writer, novelist and cultural critic Michael Bracewell accompanies the exhibition of Gilbert & George, coinciding with the 50th anniversary of their collaboration.

 

 

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the-flavour-of-france

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GALERIE THADDAEUS ROPAC – MARAIS
Irving Penn (1917-2009)
THE FLAVOUR OF FRANCE
Opening: 19 October 2017 | 6pm – 8pm
19 Okt. 2017 – 06 Jan. 2018
7 RUE DEBELLEYME, FR-75003 PARIS
http://ropac.net/exhibition/the-flavour-of-france

irwin2.jpg

Irving Penn Jean Cocteau (1 of 3), Paris, 1948
Platinum-palladium print mounted to aluminum, made 1979
Image Dimensions: 35,6 x 32,4 cm (14 x 12,75 in)
(IRP 1019.35) © Condé Nast

 

 

Galerie Thaddaeus Ropac is honoured to present its first exhibition of the iconic American photographer Irving Penn (1917-2009), The Flavour of France, from 19 October 2017 to 6 January 2018 in Paris. Titled after a photographic essay published by Irving Penn in 1960, in which he celebrates what André Gide called the “horror of the approximate” that characterises French charm, the exhibition focuses on three different bodies of work: Nudes, Small Trades and artist portraits. Dating from the period 1947–1950, each reflects in its own way the close relationship Irving Penn maintained with France throughout his life, by contact with artists, frequent visits and by their idealised redolence. The exhibition coincides with the Irving Penn centennial retrospective at Grand Palais in Paris running from 21 September 2017 to 29 January 2018, previously at the Metropolitan Museum of Art in New York. Since September 2017 Galerie Thaddaeus Ropac represents The Irving Penn Foundation in France in collaboration with Pace/MacGill Gallery, New York.

Portraits, Paris and New York, 1947-1950
Irving Penn gained international fame from his psychologically intense and elegantly composed portraits. Commissioned by Vogue’s art director and Penn’s mentor Alexander Liberman, the works strike by their graphic simplicity and immediate impact — qualities that both meet the requirements of the printed page. Penn’s portraits of artists result from demanding sessions, during which he would “find ways to melt personal defenses and encourage his sitters to emerge from their protective armor” as Maria Morris Hambourg, curator of the centennial exhibition at the Metropolitan Museum of Art, comments.
Penn coupled this psychoanalytic-like method with the use of a spare background to unveil the personality of the sitters and foreclose narrative readings of their pose. The lack of context confuses the viewer’s sense of scale and heightens awareness not just of the sitter’s body language and what it reveals, but also of what remains unseen, be it the cavernous presence of Père Couturier or the mysterious silhouette of Marlene Dietrich.
In 1947, Irving Penn began setting portraits in a small corner space made of two studio flats pushed together. To quote the photographer, “a very rich series of pictures resulted. This confinement surprisingly seemed to comfort people, soothing them. The walls were a surface to lean on or push against.” Some, like Marcel Duchamp, would play with the device; others would stick to the instructions.
Penn employed this narrative-resistant style until the end of his life, ultimately seeking for his pictures to be as “weighty and resolved” as paintings.

 

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Irving Penn Nude No. 150, New York, c. 1949-1950
Platinum-palladium print mounted to aluminum, made 1971
Image Dimensions: 46 x 44,1 cm (18,125 x 17,375 in)
© The Irving Penn Foundation
(IRP 1006.42)

 

 

Nudes, New York, 1949-1950
While working at Vogue in the late 1940s, Irving Penn initiated the personal project of photographing the female body in a pioneering way. This would become “the major artistic experience of his life”, as he himself stated. Freed from commercial expectations, he started a series of sessions to photograph nudes in his own private studio at 480 Lexington Avenue. During hours-long sessions, Irving Penn would scrutinize the changing configurations of the female body within the viewfinder of his Rolleiflex camera.
Initially, Irving Penn photographed lean models in twisting poses. Stepping away from fashion standards he then photographed curvy women, who feature in most of the final printed images.
As Maria Morris Hambourg states: “The amount of erotic content in the photographs is very high, yet, like the sessions themselves, it is held in check by a controlled, aesthetic distance. His mental library was filled instead with the simplified contours and smooth surfaces of the nudes by Arp, Brancusi, Maillol, Moore, Picasso and Matisse that had graced European art magazines in the 1930s.”
The sculptural quality of the work, where the body often appears truncated, distorted and even abstracted, is reinforced by the photographer’s focus on the tactility of the image itself. While printing the nudes, Irving Penn used an experimental process to create ethereal images that blur fine detail and flatten the undulating curves into almost abstract planes of light and shadow. Now considered a key aspect of his artistic work, this series of nudes remained largely unseen and unpublished until 1980, when exhibited at Marlborough Gallery in New York.

Small Trades, Paris, 1950
In late July 1950, Irving Penn returns to Paris to photograph the couture collections for Vogue with the idea of starting a new series dedicated to tradesmen. Equally influenced by Eugène Atget’s portraits of tradesmen at the turn of the century and the socially engaged work of Walker Evans, he developed his own vision. Instead of the vernacular setting of the street he chose to isolate the subject in a studio Vogue rented for him in the rue de Vaugirard in Paris.
In 1991 he would recall: “A steady stream of workmen, street vendors, and fringe Parisians climbed the six flights to the studio, where they waited their turn to pose between pictures of couture and portrait sittings of the distinguished.”
The workers would pose with their tools in front of the camera in the neutral space of the studio, which provided a sense of timelessness to their portrait.
As Irving Penn notes in Moments Preserved (1960) “like everyone else who has recorded the look of tradesmen and workers, I was motivated by the fact that individuality and occupational pride seem on the wane.” He would later expand the series in London and New York, progressively establishing somewhat of a typology. The Small Trades series eventually became his largest body of work.
Considered today as one of the major achievements in modern photography, this series stands as a manifesto of Penn’s photographic methodology. As he said during a symposium on modern photography organized by Edward Steichen at MoMA in 1950: “The modern photographer…brings equal interest and devotion to the problem of photographing a queen, a chair, a fashion model, a soldier, a horse. He finds something of himself in everything, and something of everything in himself.”

 

 

irwin2.jpg

Irving Penn Marcel Duchamp (1 of 2), New York, 1948
Gelatin silver print, made 1984
Image Dimensions: 24,4 x 19,4 cm (9,625 x 7,625 in)
© The Irving Penn Foundation
Courtesy Galerie Thaddaeus Ropac, London · Paris · Salzburg

 

 

About Irving Penn:

Born in 1917 in Plainfield, New Jersey to a Russian Jewish family, Penn attended the Philadelphia Museum School of Industrial Arts from 1934–38 and studied with Alexey Brodovitch in his Design Laboratory.
Irving Penn’s work initially had an ideal outlet on the pages of Vogue, where it was finely reproduced and widely disseminated. In 1943, the new art director at Vogue, Alexander Liberman, hired Penn as his associate to prepare layouts and suggest ideas for covers to the magazine’s photographers. Liberman, another Russian émigré who had worked in Paris, looked at Penn’s contact sheets from his recent travels and recognized “a mind, and an eye that knew what it wanted to see.”
After the Second World War, as Penn quickly developed a reputation for his striking style in still life and portraiture, Liberman sent him around the world on portrait and fashion assignments. These were formative experiences, which confirmed Penn’s preference for photographing in the controlled environment of a studio, where he could trim away anything that was not essential to his compositions and hone in on his subjects.
Penn’s travel for Vogue increased between 1964 and 1971, taking him to Japan, Crete, Spain, Dahomey, Nepal, Cameroon, New Guinea, and Morocco. On these trips Penn was increasingly free to focus on what truly interested him: making portraits of people in natural light.
In the early 1970s, Penn closed his Manhattan studio and immersed himself in platinum printing in the laboratory he constructed on the family farm on Long Island, NY. This led to three major series conceived for platinum: Cigarettes (1972, presented at The Museum of Modern Art in 1975), Street Material (1975–76, shown at The Metropolitan Museum of Art in 1977), and Archaeology (1979–80, exhibited at Marlborough Gallery in 1982). Like his earlier Nudes series, this work departed radically from the prevailing uses of photography. In 1984, he was honoured with a retrospective curated by John Szarkowski at The Museum of Modern Art, which toured internationally until 1989. After the retrospective, Penn resumed painting and drawing as a creative pursuit, even incorporating platinum printing into his practice. Penn’s creativity flourished during the last decades of his life. Determined to shape the body of work he left behind from such a prolific career, he also carefully structured and reduced his archives. In 2009, Penn died in New York, at the age of 92. During his lifetime, he established The Irving Penn Foundation.

Irving Penn is considered as one of the twentieth century’s great photographers, known for his arresting images and masterful printmaking. At a time when photography was primarily understood as a means of communication, he approached it with an artist’s eye and expanded the creative potential of the medium, both in his professional and personal work.

 

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thomas_bayrle

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MAK VIENNA
THOMAS BAYRLE
WENN ETWAS ZU LANG IST – MACH ES LÄNGER
Pressekonferenz:
Montag, 23. Oktober 2017 | 10:30 Uhr
Eröffnung: Opening:
Dienstag, 24. Oktober 2017 | 19 Uhr
Gastkurator
Nicolaus Schafhausen
MAK-Kuratorin Bärbel Vischer
Kustodin MAK-Sammlung Gegenwartskunst
Ausstellung: Exhibition:  25. Oktober 2017 – 2. April 2018
MAK, Stubenring 5, 1010 Wien
https://www.MAK.at

 

thomas7.jpg

Thomas Bayrle, Apfelbrei, 1974
Lithografie auf Papier Courtesy of the artist
Foto: © Wolfgang Günzel

 

THOMAS BAYRLE
WENN ETWAS ZU LANG IST – MACH ES LÄNGER
25. Oktober 2017 – 2. April 2018
Überdimensional! Eine aus unzähligen iPhones bestehende „Superform“ – iPhone meets Japan (2017) – in der MAK-Säulenhalle ist die zentrale Arbeit und zugleich der Auftakt der ersten in Österreich gezeigten institutionellen Einzelausstellung des deutschen Zeichners, Grafikers, Malers und Bildhauers Thomas Bayrle (* 1937), der am 7. November 2017 seinen 80. Geburtstag feiert. Unter dem Titel Wenn etwas zu lang ist – mach es länger, nach einem Zitat des Architekten Eero Saarinen (1910–1961), entwickelt Bayrle, der sich mit zeitaktuellen Medien auseinandersetzt, eine Erzählung zur Interaktion zwischen Kommunikationsdesign, Individuum und Gesellschaft.
Im Rahmen der Ausstellung beleuchtet Bayrle die MAK-Sammlung am Beispiel von Objekten, die die konzeptuelle Vorbildersammlung der 1863 als k. k. Österreichisches Museum für Kunst und Industrie gegründeten Institution prägen. Mit grafischen, skulpturalen, malerischen, textilen wie installativen Arbeiten verwebt er mehrere Räume ­– MAK-Säulenhalle, MAK DESIGN LABOR, MAK GALERIE und MAK-Schausammlung Gegenwartskunst – zur Projektionsfläche für seine Interpretation von „Social Fabric“, soziale Verflechtungen, die er an die Kunst des Webens anlehnt.
Weben, Vernetzen, Wiederholungen und das Prinzip des Seriellen sind bestimmende Momente in Bayrles Œuvre. Vor seinem Studium der Gebrauchs- und Druckgrafik selbst zum Musterzeichner und Weber ausgebildet, überträgt er die Faszination für Maschinelles konsequent in seine künstlerische Produktion. Mit Metaphern des Färbens, Webens und Programmierens untersucht er die Ambivalenz von Kunst, Handwerk, Industrie und lässt kaleidoskopartige Formen – Ornamente der Masse – entstehen. Beeinflusst von Op-Art (Victor Vasarely, 1906–1997) und Pop Art (Andy Warhol, 1928–1987), verband Bayrle als einer der Ersten manuelle Techniken mit computergenerierter Kunst des digitalen Zeitalters.
Themen für seine Grafiken, Fotografien, Collagen und Objekte bezieht er aus der Alltagskultur und politischen Kontexten. Seine legendären „Superformen“ – Collagen aus einer unendlichen Anzahl von Miniaturbildern – ergeben im Zusammenspiel ihrer Einzelteile einen Mikro- und Makrokosmos. Durch die Vervielfältigung von „Zellen“, Bildern und ornamentalen Formen analoger wie digitaler Dimension können seine Arbeiten als Statements zu Masse und Massenproduktion gelesen werden, so der Künstler.

 

 

ThomasB84.jpg

Thomas Bayrle, Kartoffelzähler, 1968. Variation mit Pflanze.
Siebdruck auf Papier. Courtesy of the artist.
Foto: Wolfgang Günzel © Bildrecht, Wien, 2017

Die Installation iPhone meets Japan konzipierte Bayrle eigens für das MAK. Das begehbare Szenenbild in der zwischen Neorenaissance und Industriearchitektur angesiedelten MAK-Säulenhalle, dem Zentrum des Museums und der Ausstellung, reflektiert ein japanisches Shunga von Nishikawa Sukenobu (Entwurf um 1720) aus der Asien-Sammlung des MAK. Die explizit erotischen Holzschnitte sind in Ostasien zum Massenphänomen avanciert. Bayrle übersetzt das Shunga in eine „Superform“ aus iPhones, die unter den Vorzeichen digitaler Vernetzung zwischen einem Paar, das sich dem flüchtigen Duftspiel hingibt, und architektonischen Elementen oszilliert. Die BetrachterInnen finden sich in einer Bilderflut wieder oder werden aufgefordert, die Szene von der Galerie der Halle aus zu erfassen.
„Superformen“ als Referenz auf politische, industrielle und kulturelle Ikonen wie Jesus, Mao, die Autobahn, das Smartphone oder die Tasse spiegeln in der Ausstellung Bayrles Faszination für die Idee des Ornaments. Inspiration dafür findet er unter anderem in den Schriften des Soziologen Siegfried Kracauer (1889–1966) aus dem Umfeld der Frankfurter Schule. In seinem Text Das Ornament der Masse aus der gleichnamigen Sammlung von Essays (1920–1931) vergleicht Kracauer das Ornament mit Flugbildern von Städten. Die Masse skizziert er als Träger der Ornamente, die sich durch Gemeinschaft bilden, während das Massenornament die Gegenwart und den kapitalistischen Produktionsprozess widerspiegelt. Der Mensch als Massenteilchen kann Körper zeichnen, Tabellen bestimmen oder Maschinen bedienen – Perspektiven, die auch Bayrle in den Bann ziehen.

 

ThomasB49.jpg

Thomas Bayrle, $, 1980 Karton, Miniaturautos
Privatsammlung Foto: © Wolfgang Günzel

 

Mit Bayrles Projekt wird das MAK zum Schauplatz einer neu aufgenommenen Interaktion zwischen Kunst und Handwerk, KünstlerIn und WeberIn. Anknüpfend an ein Werk für die Hartmannswillerkopf-Gedenkstätte (Elsass) für dort gefallene Soldaten des Ersten Weltkriegs, entsteht eine Wiener Tapisserie, die zweite große speziell für das MAK entwickelte Arbeit. Die in Blau getauchte ornamentale Bildfläche der iPhone Pietà (2017) zeichnet Bayrle aus Smartphones – Ornament, Apparat und Schmuck zugleich – und übersetzt den kulturellen Code der Pietà in ein Stimmungsbild gesellschaftlicher und politischer Ereignisse. Produziert wird die von Hand gefärbte und in verschiedenen Texturen und Materialien gewebte Tapisserie von einem Atelier in Aubusson im Limousin in Frankreich, wo das Weben in Kollektiven seit sechs Jahrhunderten Tradition hat. Die in der MAK-Schausammlung Gegenwartskunst gezeigte iPhone Pietà, Studien und narrative Verweise wie die Malerei Gotischer Schinken (1980) oder die Fotocollage Himmelfahrt (1988), die in einer späteren Version als Eiserner Vorhang (2003/04) in der Wiener Staatsoper zu sehen war, verdichten sich zu einem Zeichen unserer Zeit. Beten als Ritual übersetzt Bayrle in Prototypen eines Autoreifens, die gebetsmühlenartig in Bewegung gebracht werden können.
Weben als Konzept setzt sich im MAK DESIGN LABOR mit Pinsel-Studien, Stempel-Arbeiten, bildhaften und skulpturalen Geflechten aus Pappkarton und analogen Photoshop-Serien fort, die auch Reproduktionsprozesse und die Verwendung verschiedener Materialien aufzeigen. Dieses „Organigramm“ künstlerischer Produktion verweist auf Gottfried Sempers (1803–1879) Theorien zur praktischen Ästhetik. Semper geht von der Stofflichkeit der Dinge aus, die erst durch ihre Verwendung und ihr Bezugssystem Gestalt annehmen. Die schwebende Formation SARS (2008) entwickelte Bayrle als modulare Struktur, die in der Ausstellung gleichzeitig als Raumfigur eine formale und narrative Ordnung vorgibt. In seinem Reliefbild $ (1980) aus Karton, wo Miniaturautos Bahnen ziehen, zeichnet Bayrle den Knoten der Autobahn als Dollarzeichen, ein ökonomisches wie politisches Symbol.
Die MAK GALERIE mit einem Programm zu Ökonomie changiert zwischen grafischem Kabinett und „Glam Room“: Papierarbeiten der 1960er und 1970er Jahre analysieren Bayrles Prinzip, Bild und Grafik wie Logos und Piktogramme als Sprache aufzufassen. Beispielsweise überzieht er in der Arbeit Börsenbericht (1972, Teil einer Serie) ein anonymes Porträt eines Arbeiters oder eines Angestellten durch minimale Verschiebungen im Muster der Daten des 8.3.1972. In Variationen der Arbeit Kartoffelzähler (1968) setzt sich Bayrle mit dem kommunistischen China zur Zeit des Diktators und Kulturrevolutionäres Mao Zedong (1893–1976) auseinander. Bayrles Muster werden ebenso auf Mode übertragen, die im Handel erworben oder bestellt werden kann. Das Ornament – oder der Algorithmus – erfindet den Konsum.
In der MAK-Bibliothek wird im Rahmen der Ausstellung eine Auswahl von Bayrles Künstlerbüchern und Publikationen präsentiert.
Nach seiner Ausbildung zum Musterzeichner und Weber studierte Thomas Bayrle (lebt und arbeitet in Frankfurt am Main) Anfang der 1960er Jahre Grafik an der Werkkunstschule in Offenbach am Main (heute Hochschule für Gestaltung), gründete mit Bernhard Jäger (* 1935) die Gulliver-Presse und arbeitete als Drucker wie Verleger von Künstlerbüchern.
Als einer der bedeutendsten KünstlerInnen der Gegenwart und viele Jahre auch als Professor an der Städelschule in Frankfurt am Main (1975–2007) inspirierte er Generationen von KünstlerInnen und ist bis heute ein Mentor der jungen Szene. Im internationalen Kontext wurde Bayrle u. a. durch seine Teilnahmen an der Biennale von Venedig (2003 und 2009) sowie an der documenta (1964, 1977 und 2012) bekannt.
Zur Ausstellung THOMAS BAYRLE. Wenn etwas zu lang ist – mach es länger erscheint die Publikation Musterzeichner, herausgegeben von Christoph Thun-Hohenstein, Nicolaus Schafhausen und Bärbel Vischer, mit Texten von Spyros Papapetros, Nicolaus Schafhausen, Christoph Thun-Hohenstein und Bärbel Vischer (Deutsch/Englisch).
Diese Ausstellung wurde in Kooperation mit Phileas
A Fund for Contemporary Art produziert. phileas_signet_schwarz

Mit freundlicher Unterstützung Deutsche Botschaft Wien
Publikation
Musterzeichner, herausgegeben von Christoph Thun-Hohenstein, Nicolaus Schafhausen und Bärbel Vischer, mit Texten von Spyros Papapetros, Nicolaus Schafhausen, Christoph Thun-Hohenstein und Bärbel Vischer. Deutsch/Englisch, MAK, Wien/Verlag für moderne Kunst, Wien 2017

RAHMENPROGRAMM ZUR AUSSTELLUNG

Dialogführung
Di, 14.11.2017 | 20 Uhr
mit Thomas Bayrle, Nicolaus Schafhausen und
Bärbel Vischer anlässlich der VIENNA ART WEEK

MITTWOCHS IM MAK
Führung durch die Ausstellung,
anschließend weiterführendes Gespräch
im Restaurant Salonplafond im MAK
Mi, 15.11.2017 | 15 Uhr

KuratorInnenführungen
mit Nicolaus Schafhausen
Do, 25.1.2018 | 16 Uhr
Di, 6.2.2018 | 19 Uhr
Di, 27.2.2018 | 19 Uhr

KuratorInnenführungen
mit Bärbel Vischer
Do, 9.11.2017 | 16 Uhr
Do, 7.12.2017 | 16 Uhr
Di, 19.12.2017 | 19 Uhr
Fr, 9.3.2018 | 16 Uhr

Regelmäßige Führungen
bis 10.12.2017: jeden Sa, 14 Uhr und jeden So, 15 Uhr
ab 16.12.2017: jeden Sa, 14 Uhr

Rundgang durch das MAK
und die Ausstellung
Jeden Di, 18 Uhr

Kinder- und Familienprogramm
MAK Design Kids, MAK4FAMILY,
MINI MAK Tour und MINI MAK im Advent:
mehr Infos und Anmeldung unter
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https://www.MAK.at

 

 

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